Effort

“Success is dependent on effort” (Sophocles). Put forth the effort and work like your life depended on it, because it just might. Let your diligent habitual work ethic empower and motivate you to succeed, like oxygen keeping every cell in your body alive. Do not lower your standards, lest neglect, procrastination, and compromise devour dreams like a thief seeking to kill and destroy. Remember, we get what we tolerate, therefore settle for nothing less than your absolute best. Go to bed each night knowing you spent your passionate self completely, hence sleep like a baby without worry or concerns of any kind.

Avoiding Temptation

“May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit” (Romans 15:13 NIV). For change to occur a person with a shopping problem should stay out of the mall. A drinker should stay out of the bar. A gambler should stay out of the casino. A person trying to lose weight should stay away from a buffet. It is easier to avoid temptation than it is trying to beat temptation. Acknowledging that we possess a self-created problem within ourselves allows the ability to let solutions work through and for us. That permits us to change our ways by living in a positive, progressive, forward moving, massively growing manner. As Tony Robbins advocates, “Raise your standards. Change your shoulds into musts. Stop shoulding all over yourself.”

Intentional Help

Let’s remember not to perspire when we ought to be sweating. Work ethic encompasses unstoppable diligent effort toward architecting our lives how we wish with the cards dealt to us. There will be ebbs and flows of highs and lows, although maximize the voyage by becoming full of joy, vigor, enthusiasm, and tranquility along our ABLE quest to greatness. Curiosity and desire, combined with helping others is key to our daily vitality. A simple smile or sincere complement is useful and uplifting for all. Who have you helped today?

Do What You Love

“Too many people are thinking of security instead of opportunity. They seem more afraid of life than death” (James F. Byrnes). Actor and comedian, Jim Carrey, said, “You can fail at what you don’t want, so you might as well take a chance at doing what you love.” Jim Carrey learned that valuable lesson from his father who was fired from his allegedly safe and secure accounting job.¹ Freedom lives on the other side of fear and doubt.