Forming Good Habits is a Choice

Today, on a scale from 1-10, whereas 1 is very unlikely and 10 is extremely probable, how ready are you to begin exercising, quit smoking, eat healthy, abandon bad relationships and poor influences, decide to do or create your best work, stop spending more income than you produce, give your time and talents freely to someone without thought of return, learn something new, eradicate an alcohol or drug problem, hug and kiss your spouse and kids, recognize and rid a bad habit, clean and organize your house and car, or relentlessly love and accept yourself completely? You cannot pick number 7. After selecting your question(s) and number(s), ask yourself, “Why didn’t I choose a lower number?” If you picked the number 1, please use discretion toward seeking expert counsel in whichever area necessary.

Maturity

“A mature person is one who does not only think in absolutes, who is able to be objective even when deeply stirred emotionally, who has learned that there is both good and bad in all people and all things, and who walks humbly and deals charitably with the circumstances of life” (Eleanor Roosevelt). View life in triads of opinions, advice, expertise, and suggestions. Professionals and skilled individuals may believe they ultimately have your best interests or solutions at hand, while reality and reason points out three drastically opposing views. Seeking out multiple physicians within different specialties regarding treatment modalities can reveal optimal strategies producing superior outcomes. Similar philosophies hold true regarding seeking out great advice from people that have 10 to 20 years further experience beyond ourselves about the dealings in life we desire to victoriously overcome or goals we ardently want to achieve. Be humble, patient, merciful, and grateful, while crossing every person’s path, as these are signs of real maturity.

Health 90/10

People don’t become unhealthy because of 10% of what they eat, but 90% of consumption. We manifest fruits of love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control from 90% of what we think, do, believe, give, and whom we associate with; not the typical 10%. Do not be misguided by the 10%, lest 10% be transformed into a greater unwarranted amount. Choose the best for your life and the lives of others.

Health

“Use your health, even to the point of wearing it out. This is what true abundant and fearless living is about. Spend all you have before you die; and do not outlive yourself” (George Bernard Shaw). Prudently fill yourself so full of goodness that your cup is always overflowing with greatness onto others; for goodness creates greatness. Focus on enhancing health as a primary goal to acquire indefinitely, because without it nothing else is so vibrantly alive.

Choices–Boundaries–Growth

“It is only by introducing the young to great literature, drama and music, and to the excitement of great science that we open to them the possibilities that lie within the human spirit—enable them to see visions and dream dreams” (Eric Anderson). This applies to all ages alike. Knowing what we don’t want helps us understand more clearly what we truly desire. This can emerge through learning from other people’s experiences (OPEs) or our own, being open-minded and receptive toward new ideas, growing knowledge and skills, taking prompt action, and through self-reflection. Being prudent by maintaining appropriate boundaries is our responsibility toward respecting life, growth, and prosperity.

Additionally, on Netflix there is an insightful documentary, Obesity: The Post Mortem, which shows the deleterious effects from poor dietary and sedentary lifestyle choices. A corpulent woman’s autopsy reveals reasons for her demise. It can be a motivating factor toward taking immediate life-altering action, therefore not dying prematurely from preventable etiological contributors.

Moreover, due to obesity, the heart has to pump much harder to propel oxygenated blood throughout excessive adipose tissue and vasculature in our bodies, while returning deoxygenated blood back to the lungs and heart to do all over again. The burdensome strain can lead to heart wall thickening, cardiac chamber compensatory enlargement, and subsequent non-compensatory heart failure, among other unwanted illnesses. Let’s decide how we want to live, while practicing daily self-restraint, thus strengthening ourselves against any problematic agonistic consuming approaches for dopamine. We can live to eat or eat to be fully juiced, energized and alive. Ideally, each of us begins and continues striving for the latter.