True Motivation

“You can get a lot farther with a kind word and a gun than a kind word alone” (Al Capone). If a gun was held to your head or that of a family member and you were told you must stop a bad habit to prevent death, you could do it. That is called intrinsic motivation. We don’t want to coerce anyone, although we must sell ourselves in order to achieve our dreams. Desire the acquisition of dreams come true as badly as you crave the air you breathe. Dare to be original by being good and principled, while upholding steadfast concrete moral values and associate with people that sustain and reciprocate the like.

Living Life Full of Vision, Hope, Courage and Resilience

“The most pathetic person in the world is someone who has sight, but has no vision” (Helen Keller). Look for the good in people and ourselves, while desiring more abundance of health, wealth, love, and joy upon others. As an American author and speaker, Helen Keller became deaf and blind by 19 months of age and mute shortly thereafter because of a debilitating fever, yet she did not let that stop her from maintaining her vision and regaining her voice.¹¹ She was the first deaf and blind person to earn her Bachelor’s degree, in addition earning cum laude.¹² Helen Keller is a true inspiration to the world and a wonderful example for people with similar ailments. Now, people that are deaf and blind have infinitely more hope, knowing that success and true quality of living are possible through pure determination and unwavering faith. Many people acquiring various ailments and problems will not be the first nor the last, yet triumph through with resilience, courage, and a positive mental attitude. Don’t let negativity or seemingly unjust circumstances rob hope, joy, and love from your precious life.

Love Lives On

”Millions long for immortality who do not know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon” (Susan Ertz). Develop reasons or motivating factors that truly make you feel alive, driving you to get out of bed each day. Get really good at something. Live wisely and make that dash count by choosing to make a difference with your one and only precious life. Remember the loving kindness from those that have gone before you. Let their love live on—in you.

Helping Others by Helping Ourselves

Witnessing firsthand and personally experiencing too many of those aforementioned harmful effects in my life manifests deep pain and empathy for people, which is a pivotal reason for choosing to help others. A dominant universal goal regarding all spiritual realms is to mitigate pain and suffering. Caring for individuals working as an intensive care unit (ICU) nurse constantly makes me question, “Is there something we as a community, society, nation, and global enterprise can do to help prevent these tragic fatalities?” Tears of compassion and frustration well up and trickle down an anguished face, while contemplating the horrors that families of these loved ones face and endure.

“I always wondered why somebody doesn’t do something about that. Then I realized that I was somebody” (Lily Tomlin). Can such tragedies be averted? Young teenagers and adults are too often admitted for heroin overdoses with irreversible anoxic brain injuries, while ventilators keep their bodies alive as the brain swells, crushing parts of the cerebrum or spinal cord ending in brain death. All four extremities spastically and uncontrollably jerk up and down with both eyes transiently shooting open seemingly bulging from their skulls as their necrotic viscera pour out. Paralytics are administered because families do not need to witness such horror. Others drink themselves silly, which leads to irreversible pancreatitis or hepatic destruction, culminating in multisystem organ failure and subsequent death.

Even today, visualizing and feeling the glowing warmth, energy, kindness, and friendly smile radiating from a fellow high school classmate’s face 20 years later is poignantly palpable. His abundant energy, radiant countenance, joy, and ability to make others laugh was contagious. He made the tragic decision to try heroin one time, which ended his short life. Let’s decide to help others make better choices by making them for ourselves first.

Practice Living the Good Life

“Go confidently in the direction of your dreams! Live the life you’ve imagined. As you simplify your life, the laws of the universe will be simpler” (Henry David Thoreau). People discover their potential from knowledge acquisition combined with practical application. We become forward growing the moment we develop the courage to acknowledge and admit our faults, while seeking solutions to our problems and taking massive immediate action toward solving the underlying harmful culprits. The more competent, confident, and autonomous we become at life equates to a good life at whatever we choose to do.

Perception

“Mishaps are like knives that either serve us or cut us, as we grasp them by the blade or the handle” (James Russell Lowell). Applying temporary Band-Aids to cover our past wounds, mistakes, or feelings of self-inadequacy is futile and may even be deadly. Choose to allow mistakes to be advantageous, while seeking out good in them by becoming a good-finder.

Changing our perceptions and attitudes can be very helpful. If we become disillusioned by the shoes that we have on, just think about the person with no feet. A little different perspective can change our own personal world. Life is too short and precious to be stuck in the past or future. Focus on fully living today and each day.

Ownership Offers Healing

“All things are difficult before they are easy” (Thomas Fuller). We become more fulfilled the sooner we recognize and accept the harmful self-inflicting problems we create within ourselves, while deciding to replace old destructive ways with positive forward moving and life-altering strategies. Paths toward healing manifest after recognizing a problem, accepting or owning the cause, and forgiving ourselves and others for partaking in immoral behaviors. We are ultimately accountable and responsible for where we are in life, period.

Man or Woman Up

“Never feel self-pity, the most destructive emotion there is. How awful to be caught up in the terrible squirrel cage of self” (Millicent Fenwick). Many people that drink alcohol excessively or do illicit drugs are trying to fill feelings of emptiness or a void in life. When a person loses control over themselves and the food or substance is eating (killing or creating a negative effect) them and not the person consuming the food or substance to stay heathy, invigorated with energy and aliveness to achieve greatness, then it’s time for a serious inward radically transparent and truthful self-examination. Be humble enough to ask for help when necessary. None of us knows everything, while acknowledging how little we know may ignite the fuse necessary toward seeking out transformational resources. Don’t die in lonely despair because an oversized ego or fear of embarrassment stole your true potential to fully live an extraordinary liberating life.

Controlling the Controllable

Feelings linked to our identity have the potential and incredible strength to drive us toward repeating both good and bad behaviors. Be aware what you’re telling yourself about you. Anytime people say, “I can’t,” or feed an addiction or poor behavior with self-limiting beliefs, they are making deliberate conscious and sometimes unconscious choices not to live out their incredible greatness within. Being aware of what you do and why can allow for conscious control over behavioral patterns, therefore giving people the power to consciously choose a fulfilling life instead of downward cycles of misery, regret, and possible early demise. We all have the ability to pick a new identity that cyclically moves us upward, onward, and lifeward.

Managing

The art of managing focuses on time, money and quality, while one typically takes precedence, others are neglected. The right people must operate in the correct positions to optimize a team or business. Do not try to manage people because people are not meant to be managed, only lead. Optimally, skillful individuals independently think for themselves, efficiently getting important tasks or projects done first prior to moving on to smaller objectives, are prepared for emergencies, and have relentless work ethic infused with loyalty toward unified goals, missions, visions, and causes. They don’t let inflated egos hinder humility to obtain objective inputs from others about what may be unknown to them, hence hindering growth, progress, and fruitful success. Being humble enough to acknowledge our blind spots from objective feedback allows deep reflection to personally change or find individuals to complement places where we may be weak. We can all be leaders by influencing and inspiring people around us by our radically honest and genuinely upright principled example. Make sure you give yourself strong reasons for passing through this life without living in fear or regret. How are you doing with managing and leading yourself?