Anger and Gratitude

“He who angers you conquers you” (Elizabeth Kenny). Arguing leaves one and typically both sides at a loss, especially in marital relationships and through argumentative parenting. Do not be a fault finder and persistently tell people what they are doing wrong. Instead, genuinely praise the other person first and then make your requests known tactfully. Ask yourself what the other person wants that will encourage, inspire, and motivate him or her to accomplish a specific objective. Don’t become angry and let fuming out on others only reap their resentment and possible defiance in return.

“Anger is never without a reason, but seldom with a good one” (Benjamin Franklin). We cannot be peaceful and angry at the same time. Remember, delay smothers and soothes the blazing fiery emotions of anger. People may not recall what you said, but they remember how you made them feel. Do not let your emotions of anger fester overnight being our subconscious minds are constantly working for or against us 24 hours daily. Minimize and eradicate anger by using your conscious mind to forgive and give thanks, often. Gratitude leads to happiness, not the other way around.

Embracing Positive Change

“He that won’t be counseled, can’t be helped” (Benjamin Franklin). Remember that the Bible, among other wise suggestions, philosophies, and advice give extremely helpful tools to live prudent and productive lives. You must decide for yourself what works best. Please remain open-minded, while embracing PMAs. Why is it that everyone is trying to do me good?

Immortal Minds

“If we work upon marble, it will perish; if we work upon brass, time will efface it; if we rear temples, they will crumble into dust; but if we work upon immortal minds and instill into them just principles we are then engraving that upon tablets which no time will efface, but will brighten and brighten to all eternity” (Daniel Webster). Look at Benjamin Franklin’s 13 virtues and various biblical principles that can be acquired and practically applied. Write down your own virtues, principles, and life philosophies. Examine your lists and decide which maps and strategies should be kept or thrown out. Seek additional beliefs that will profoundly add extraordinary value to your life, hence others as well.

Forget about justice, instead, focusing on grace and forgiveness. Nothing in life is more important than people. Allow mercy to be your policy for the fallibility of human beings. Be a person of value, subsequently adding value to others. Serve others, offering a helping hand, by caring first and foremost. Let helping people meet their wants and needs be a top priority in your life. Increasing energy and happiness will certainly ensue. Give others kind, affirming, and encouraging words, attention, praise, and listening ears. See each person as important and valuable, possessing multitudes of potential. Visualize, respect, and treat everyone as self-actualized, rather than how they see themselves currently. People have good intentions. Embracing positive mental attitudes is a lifestyle. Share with others, giving and doing all things in excellence, above and beyond their expectations.